Madia radiata
status box

threatened

Illustration from Abrams (1960)

Illustration from Abrams (1960)

Photo taken in the Tumey Hills, Ventura County by Dean W. Taylor

Photo taken in the Tumey Hills, Ventura County by Dean W. Taylor

Photo taken in San Benito County © 1995 by Dean W. Taylor

Photo taken in San Benito County © 1995 by Dean W. Taylor

Photo taken in the Tumey Hills, San Benito County by Dean W. Taylor

Photo taken in the Tumey Hills, San Benito County by Dean W. Taylor

A red polygon indicates an extant occurrence; yellow indicates the occurrence has been extirpated

A red polygon indicates an extant occurrence; yellow indicates the occurrence has been extirpated


This fact sheet was prepared by Grey F. Hayes and Dean W. Taylor under award NA04N0S4200074 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC). The statements, findings, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NOAA or the DOC.

© Copyright 2006, Elkhorn Slough Coastal Training Program

Last updated: Aug 15, 2007 11:40

Common Names - showy tarplant, golden tarplant

Family - Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

State Status - none

Federal Status - none

Habitat

Arid hills in the rain shadow of the Diablo Ranges. Most frequently on adobe or gypseous clay soils, in grasslands, herb-rich openings in scrub, or herb-rich openings in oak woodlands. Appearing only in wet years in many known sites.

Key Characteristics

Annual herb <9dm tall; entire plant with golden brown glandular trichomes; flowers showy, with 8–16 ray flowers, their ligules <20 mm long; anthers of disk flowers black; very similar in gross habit and appearance to Monolopia major (which differs technically in having a naked receptacle, i.e. without marginal chaffy bracts).

Flowering Period

February to May

Reference Population

None locally; Tumey Hills (Fresno County)

Global Distribution

Endemic to the South Coast Ranges of California

Conservation

Extirpated localities are in the northern end of the range in the Mount Diablo region. This species is likely to occur in the the SCoR portions of Stanislaus and Merced counties. Two reported occurrences from the floor of the San Joaquin Valley in Kern County are unverified. Plants are easily damaged by cattle of trampling of clay soils on steep hills.

Reference

Abrams, L. 1960. Illustrated Flora of the Pacific States, Vol. 4. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA.

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